Domain

You can’t have a website without a domain name. Like a street address that tells people where you live, a domain helps customers drive directly to your website. We can help you find one you’ll love.

Why do you need a domain name?

The most successful businesses use the same set of words and images in all customer touchpoints – on their website, in their emails and order confirmations, on their signs, etc. This is branding at its simplest. And the digital pieces of your brand all spring from your domain name.

Found a great domain? Here’s what to do with it.

Build a new website on it or forward your domain name to an existing website to attract more visitors.

Create a professional email address you’ll be proud to share with customers.

Make it easy for customers to find you on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and other social platforms. Learn More

Invest in promising names you later sell for a profit.

A word about privacy

When you register a domain name with any company, your name, address, and phone are published in the public WhoIs database as required by the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). Email and telephone spammers scour this database, gathering emails and addresses they can use for spam, scams and identity theft. Privacy Protection is the answer.

How do I get a domain name?

  1. Decide on a domain name extension. The extension is the part at the end of the domain name – .net.biz.org or .com, for example.
  2. Think about what you’d like on the other side of the dot. It could be your business name or your specialty.
  3. Type the domain you want into the box at the top of this page. We’ll tell you if that particular domain is available and show others you may like better.
  4. Pick one, add it to your cart and check out. You are now the proud owner of your very own domain. As long as it’s registered to you, no one else may use it.

Got any tips on finding a good domain name?

> Make it easy to remember. This is why many businesses get domains with their business names in them. Some people – including Bob Parsons – even choose their business name after they have a domain they like.

> Don’t register one that’s trademarked, copyrighted or being used by another company. This can lead to losing the domain and/or legal problems.

> Shorter is usually better because they’re easier for customers to remember. It’s also easier to get matching usernames for Facebook, Twitter and any other social media accounts you have.

> Got a local business? Include your neighborhood, city or country in your domain so local customers can quickly see where you are. Check the list of geographic domain extensions – .berlin, .nyc – to see if there’s one for your area.

> Avoid numbers or hyphens. Anyone who hears your web address won't know if you're using a numeral (5) or “five.” If your business name has a number in it, register both versions – with the numeral and with the number spelled out. Dashes are just asking for trouble and generally look unprofessional.

> Get more than one. As traffic to your website increases, you may attract the attention of copycats who’ll snatch up similar domain names in the hopes of drawing traffic away from you. Register similar or misspelled domains early so this won’t be an issue later.

Hosting

Hosting is what makes your site visible on the web. For others to see your website, it needs to be stored – or “hosted” – on a publicly-accessible computer (a server). That storage space and the features that come with it make up your hosting plan. Some websites require an entire server to themselves. Others can share a server with 100s of other websites. If you’re not sure what type of hosting plan your site needs, keep reading or call our 24/7 service. We offer fast, reliable plans for every need - from a basic blog to the high-powered site. We've got you covered.

Types of hosting

Web hosting (Shared)
Think of this as an apartment complex. It’s one big building (a server) where hundreds of residents (websites) live. You have all the resources you need, but you pay less since you’re sharing them with multiple residents.

Virtual Private Server (VPS)
If shared web hosting is like an apartment complex, VPS is more like a townhome. You’ll enjoy upgraded resources AND you’ll be sharing them with much fewer people. This gives you more power, flexibility, and control, but it also costs a little more.

Dedicated Server
This is exactly what it sounds like – a single-tenant virtual machine that’s dedicated to you and you alone – which makes it the ultra-modern single family home in our analogy. It’s the most costly option, but only high-traffic, resource-intensive websites really need it.